CRESCENT CITY—It could be called a work in progress, or a progression of work. But whatever the order, its creator has a vision for the future that foresees a major role for Mother Nature and a lot of pulling out of grass. The little native garden at the Little Blue House is the brain child of local resident Angela Tischler, who along with Maureen Blandford plant and tend the wild garden behind the local heritage center. It is intended to be a showcase for native plants as well as an alternative to the monoculture of lawns.
“We’ve had some failures and some success in turning this piece of lawn into a garden,” Tischler mused. After all, the garden is barely a year in the making. In fact the garden, and Tischler’s gardening experience began simultaneously. Area residents will remember that Tischler retired in 2000 as Pierson postmaster, and for five years wrote “It’s your Turn,” a regular newspaper column. “I wanted to do this to get more people interested in native plants and nature in general and to get rid of lawns. When you stop mowing you get all sorts of interesting things (growing), some we can and some we can’t identify. In the springtime it was wonderful to discover those things that had totally disappeared (during the previous summer or winter) come back.”
One of the first things Tischler did to get the project rolling was to have the little plot certified as a wildlife habitat. It is now certified as both a Florida Wildlife Habitat by the University of Florida IFAS, and by the National Wildlife Federation as a Certified Wildlife Habitat.

CRESCENT CITY—It could be called a work in progress, or a progression of work. But whatever the order, its creator has a vision for the future that foresees a major role for Mother Nature and a lot of pulling out of grass. The little native garden at the Little Blue House is the brain child of Crescent City resident Angela Tischler, who along with Maureen Blandford plant and tend the wild garden behind the local heritage center. It is intended to be a showcase for native plants as well as an alternative to the monoculture of lawns.

“We’ve had some failures and some success in turning this piece of lawn into a garden,” Tischler mused. After all, the garden is barely a year in the making. In fact the garden, and Tischler’s gardening experience began simultaneously. “I wanted to do this to get more people interested in native plants and nature in general and to get rid of lawns. When you stop mowing you get all sorts of interesting things (growing), some we can and some we can’t identify. In the springtime it was wonderful to discover those things that had totally disappeared (during the previous summer or winter) come back.”

One of the first things Tischler did to get the project rolling was to have the little plot certified as a wildlife habitat. It is now certified as both a Florida Wildlife Habitat by the University of Florida IFAS, and by the National Wildlife Federation as a Certified Wildlife Habitat.

Visiting the garden is easy. It is open daily and visitors can park in the lot at the Woman’s Club next door just off US 17 in the center of townLittle Blue House in Crescent CityLantana. There is no admission charge. The garden’s caretakers request that visitors stay on the mowed pathways because a wide variety of plants that are both growing and dormant are in the beds.

The Little Blue House heritage center is open two days a week, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesdays and Saturdays.

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